Becoming a Finn in Finland: Your Guide to this Charming Country | Club Mahindra
Experiences - Jan 06, 2020

Becoming a Finn in Finland: Your Guide to this Charming Country

Holiday Club Saariselkä -

Think of Finland, and you imagine a fairy tale with thick green forests, carpets of glistening snow, jingling reindeers, impish elves, and pretty little towns. All of this is true. Finland is charming, beautiful and safe. Dig a little deeper, under its pretty cover, and you’ll find so much fun, quirkiness and character in this country. Did you know that Finland has the highest coffee consumption in the world? That it hosts sports like a mosquito hunting competition, a mobile phone throwing competition and a wife carrying race? Finland holds records for most heavy metal bands in the world, highest milk consumption and greater number of saunas than cars. Who wouldn’t want to get to know this fun, unique and charming country? Today, we’re going to introduce you to the Finnish way of life. Prepare to be surprised.

The Classic Look: If you’re wondering what to pack for Finland, the answer is black. This is a classic colour in Finland and many locals dress in black and then accessorise with colourful shoes, scarves and accessories. Locals tend to go for casual, comfortable and practical clothes for most of the year.

Finnish Fashion Across the Year: For most of the year, Finland experiences cold temperatures, so sweaters, scarves, hats, thermals and other layers are essential. For a few months (in Spring, Summer and Fall), you can wear floral skirts, leather jackets, comfortable shirts, tops and shorts (if it’s sunny enough). Always carry an extra shrug or sweater though, in case the chill gets to you. Don’t forget to pack a bathing suit for a visit to the all-important Finnish sauna.

The Traditional Look: The traditional clothes in Finland are bright and colourful. The accessories are made from leather and metals and the dresses have rich embroidery. The women wear a skirt, cotton blouse, vest, jacket, apron, scarf and a cap. Traditional men’s clothing is a shirt, trousers, waistcoat, jacket, headdress, scarf and buckled shoes. Keep in mind that there will be small differences in the traditional dress, depending on where you are in the country.

Eating like a Local: Finns are passionate about food and fiercely loyal to their country’s culinary roots. Although you can indulge in different kinds of cuisine in Finland, don’t forget to sample some of the country’s finest dishes. Grab a fork and a knife and let’s see what’s cooking in Finland’s kitchens.

Karjalanpiiraka (pronounced as karyalan-piraka) This popular pastry is made from crispy rye crust, filled with soft rice pudding and topped with egg and butter. Enjoy it for breakfast, as a snack or even at important occasions like a traditional Finnish wedding.

Leipajuusto or juustoleipä (pronounced as yoo-sto-lay-bah): Are you a fan of cheese? Then you must try this dish. Fresh cheese (made from rich cow’s milk) is often served with cloudberry fruit jam or coffee.

Kalakukko: Finland’s cuisine can be hearty, comforting and filling. Kalakukko ticks all these boxes. This pie is made with rye bread, seasoned with salt and then stuffed with the goodness of fish, bacon and pork.

Korvapuusti: Craving a sweet treat with your coffee? Why not order Korvapuusti – a cinnamon roll drenched with the richness of cardamom.

Lihapullat (pronounced without the ‘t’): All that fresh air and hiking will make you hungry! So, fill your tummy with the goodness of rich Finnish meatballs, served with creamy mashed potatoes, gravy, lingonberry jam and pickled cucumber.

Salmiakki: This one’s a bit of an acquired taste. Salmiakki is a type of liquorice, flavoured with ammonium chloride, for its salty taste. You can eat it like a candy, sprinkle it over ice cream, add it to a cocktail or even use it while preparing a meat dish.

Poronkaristys (pronounced as pour-on-kri-stis): This is a dish for the adventurous and curious. Reindeer meat is thinly sliced, fried, spiced and cooked in either water, cream or beer until it becomes tender. The meat is then topped with sugared lingonberries, accompanied by a mound of mashed potatoes and cucumber pickles.

Mustikkapiirakka (pronounced as moos-tik-kapiir-akka): Round off your journey of Finnish cuisine with a thick slice of blueberry pie. The rich crust is filled with yoghurt and berries and served with fresh milk. A comfort for the tummy and the soul.

How to speak like a local:

Finnish – the official language – can seem a bit intimidating when it comes to pronunciation and the length of words. However, learning a few phrases will help you connect with locals and make your way around Finland.

Kiitos – Please / Thank you. You can use Kiitos or the more informal kiiti to thank bartenders, cab drivers, cashiers and anyone you encounter during your trip.

Puhuketto englantia? – Do you speak English? Always a great way to lead the conversation into a more comfortable zone.

Hei Hei - (Hi/ Bye)

En ymmärrä - I don’t understand. If your best efforts to speak Finnish don’t work, this is a great phrase to keep handy.

Puhuisitteko hieman hitaammin? – Can you speak slowly? You may have mastered the language but not the speed.

Anteeksi – I’m sorry/ excuse me. If you need someone to move out of the way or if you want to apologise. Many Finns use the shorter version “anteeks”.

Missa on vessa?: Where’s the bathroom? Essential for any emergency! Missa on means “where is”, which can be used if one has to look for places or objects too.

How to celebrate like a local:

Planning your Finland tourism itinerary? According to Club Mahindra Reviews, Finland is choc-full of festivals throughout the year. One, for instance, is the Midsummer Festival, which is a haven for unmarried women seeking their matrimonial future. For music, art and film lovers, the Flow Festival is an absolutely fascinating and enriching experience. For all the metalheads, the Tuska Open Air Metal Festival should definitely be on their lists.

However, there is one festival that is beloved in Finland, and that is Christmas. This country is the home of Santa, so a Christmas in Finland is an essential life experience.

So, how is Christmas celebrated? Over 13 days, including Christmas Eve.

All of Finland is covered in snow and accessorised with Christmas decorations. On December 13th, St. Lucia’s Day, candles are lit, Christmas trees are bought, carols are sung, and buns, cookies, coffee and mulled wine are shared by families. A visit to a Finnish sauna is customary and this is followed by the traditional Christmas dinner feast, which leaves everyone feeling sleepy and full. Finally, a visit to Santa’s village in Rovaniemi is the icing on the Christmas cake.

Finland Tourism is full of incredible surprises. Festivals, food and fun are found in every corner of this country. Make the most of your time in Finland, by booking a stay at Club Mahindra’s Holiday Club resorts in Finland. Visit our website to read the Club Mahindra Reviews and find out about the Club Mahindra membership fees. We’ll help you discover the fantastic in Finland!

More About Club Mahindra

Mahindra Holidays & Resorts India Limited (MHRIL), India’s leading player in the leisure hospitality industry, offers quality family holidays as also stated by Club Mahindra Resort Reviews, primarily through vacation ownership memberships. While Club Mahindra Membership Fees gives you opportunity to explore your holidays across world, the other brands offered by the company are – Club Mahindra Resorts Fundays and Svaastha Spa. As on Mar 31, 2019, MHRIL has 61+ resorts across India and abroad and its subsidiary, Holiday Club Resorts Oy, Finland, a leading vacation ownership company in Europe has 33 resorts across Finland, Sweden and Spain. Visit us at www.clubmahindra.com.

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.