Must-visit Places That Were A Part Of India’s Freedom Struggle | Club Mahindra
Travel - Aug 14, 2018

Must-visit Places That Were A Part Of India’s Freedom Struggle

While apathy and time have already chipped away at most of the monuments from our glorious history, there are some places left where you will be able to relive the stories of India’s struggle for independence. Here are eight of them, handpicked for you to visit.

1. Kakori Memorial, Lucknow

If you haven’t heard of Kakori, you’re probably unaware of one of the most defining moments in India’s struggle for freedom. The town is known for the ‘Kakori train robbery’ that took place on the night of 8th August 1925, and involved Chandrashekhar Azad, Ashfaqullah Khan, and Ram Prasad Bismil, among others. The place is therefore a must-visit for every patriotic Indian.

2. Cellular Jail, Andaman and Nicobar Islands

Also called ‘kala pani’, this colonial jail housed many freedom fighters in pre-Independent India. Located in Port Blair, the place evokes painful memories of what life must have been like for the political prisoners who were exiled to this remote island. Most of the cells are still intact, and the place is today a National Memorial visited by people from around the world.

3. Jhansi Fort, Uttar Pradesh

The Fort of Jhansi stands as a tribute to the freedom fighter Rani Lakshmibai who gave her life to the cause. She stood up against British imperialism and then risked a full-blown war to save her land. She also took on the neighbouring Datia and Orchha kingdoms that were planning an invasion. People visit the fort to appreciate the sacrifice that she made for her country.

4. Aga Khan Palace, Pune

Now also known as the Gandhi National Museum, the Aga Khan Palace is yet another location that saw many freedom fighters including Mahatma Gandhi imprisoned during the freedom struggle. His wife Kasturba died in prison here, and it serves as her samaadhi.

5. Dandi, Gujarat

The Dandi Salt March led by Mahatma Gandhi is a notable chapter in the Indian independence movement. The march, which started from Sabarmati Ashram, took 24 days to reach Dandi. If you want to experience a slice of history, Dandi should be on your list.

6. Red Fort, DelhiIn

the midst of the bustling national capital, the Red Fort stands high as a symbol of India’s might. It is where Jawaharlal Nehru first hoisted Independent India’s national flag on 15th August 1947. It is also where the Prime Minister addresses the nation every year on the eve of Independence Day.

7. Champaran, Bihar

Champaran saw India’s first civil disobedience movement launched by Mahatma Gandhi. Also known as Champaran Satyagraha, this was a protest to let farmers grow crops other than Indigo after its demand dropped. The British were forced to grant farmers compensation and more control over farming, along with other benefits.

8. Jalianwala Bagh, Amritsar

Jalianwala Bagh was home to one of the most tragic incidents to occur in pre-independence India. General Dyer ordered his men to open fire at unarmed protesters, killing thousands, including women and children. Remnants of the gruesome assault can still be seen in the walls and the well with bullet marks.

After visiting these places, you will feel as if you have relived a part of history. These enduring symbols should rightly remind all Indians of the long and difficult struggle for freedom. So take your family on a ‘historical’ holiday that will prove educational for all, and after each day of exploration return to your Club Mahindra resort filled with pride and love for your country.

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